Finding Patience, by Virginia Lieto and Carole Hahn Panzner

When the Livingstone family relocates, their daughters miss their old neighborhood and friends. The eldest, Faith can’t wait for school to start so that she can make new friends. Unfortunately, Faith is shy, and the children on the school bus, her classmates, and the lunchtime crowd seem more interested in each other than in Faith.

After a stressful first day, faith runs to her bedroom to hide her disappointment. Her perceptive mother follows her and offers advice, “It takes time to make friends. You just need a little patience.” Together they pray that God will give Faith patience.

Unfortunately, the following days bring neither friends nor patience. Mr. and Mrs. Livingstone decide that a puppy could brighten the spirits of their daughters. No, he isn’t called “Patience.”

Faith suspects that patience, the virtue has arrived when she is able to ignore an obnoxious classmate, but knows God answers her prayers when she makes her first new friend. You’ll never guess her name.

Virginia Lieto crafts a relevant and timely story with universal appeal. Suitable for young readers, for story time in class, and for home reading, it addresses a problem children face in our highly mobile society.

Carole Hahn Panzner’s illustrations capture the emotions of the entire Livingstone family. The poignant drawing of Mrs. Livingstone consoling Faith after her first day in her new school delivers a powerful non-verbal message which not only supports the text, but it touches readers of every age, sharing both Faith’s agony and her mother’s concern.

Consider Finding Patience as a comforting gift for families with young children who have relocated or who will soon do so.

I won my review copy of Finding Patience thanks to the generosity of the author as she supported the launch of Carolyn Astfalk’s latest release, Rightfully Ours.

Posted in Book Review, Catechetics, Christian education of youth, Faith, Family Life, Fiction, fiction, Juvenile fiction, Prayer | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

CWG Prayer Chain Post: April 23, 2017

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

First Peter 1:3-9

Blessed be God the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who in his great mercy has given us a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead and into a heritage that can never be spoilt or soiled and never fade away. It is reserved in heaven for you who are being kept safe by God’s power through faith until the salvation which has been prepared is revealed at the final point of time. This is a great joy to you, even though for a short time yet you must bear all sorts of trials; so that the worth of your faith, more valuable than gold, which is perishable even if it has been tested by fire, may be proved — to your praise and honour when Jesus Christ is revealed. You have not seen him, yet you love him; and still without seeing him you believe in him and so are already filled with a joy so glorious that it cannot be described; and you are sure of the goal of your faith, that is, the salvation of your souls.

 


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


APRIL INTENTION PRAYER

The Gloria
Glory to God in the highest. And on earth peace to men of good will. We praise You. We bless You. We adore you. We glorify You. We give You thanks for Your great glory. O Lord God, heavenly King, God the Father almighty. O Lord Jesus Christ, the Only-begotten Son. O Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father: you Who take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us. You Who take away the sins of the world, receive our prayer. You Who sit at the right hand of the Father, have mercy on us. For you alone are holy. You alone are the Lord. You alone, O Jesus Christ, are most high. Together with the Holy Spirit in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | 1 Comment

The Twelve Steps to being a Spiritual Writer

lrosarykeyboard

Step Nine – Make direct amends to fellow writers, publishers, illustrators, family or readers that I may have harmed wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

Last week we worked on reparation. Did you make amends for your wrongs? Did you find creative ways to repair harms you had done? Starting is not easy, but the journey becomes a joy once you discover the benefits of restoring your soul to the status it was meant to be in. Next Sunday is Divine Mercy Sunday! What a Blessing! As you go about your list and make reparation to those you have harmed, others will be revealed to you. Healing is an ongoing process. Isn’t the Mercy of Jesus great! Lent is ending – the Resurrection has come, and Mercy is around the corner. Making reparation is not always easy. If you have faced rejection- unite that rejection to the rejection of Jesus. It is a healing process – well worth the journey.

 

Now is the time to make amends to you. It is often harder to see the harm you have done to yourself than the harm you have done to others. How have you harmed yourself as a writer? Have you put your writing last in your life? How will you make reparation to yourself? Have you been afraid to step up with courage and send your work out? What will you do to forgive yourself and step forward? Did you use false humility to talk down your gift? Were you afraid to ask for that review? Did you turn down that speaking engagement? The list of harms that you have done to yourself as a writer is endless. Forgive yourself and make reparation to yourself. Ask Jesus to open your eyes to the harms you have done to yourself as a writer. Now go forward to heal your relationship with the writer within you. Find creative ways to heal. Maybe you need to spend quality time writing or promoting your own writing. Maybe you deserve to go to that writing retreat or conference. Perhaps you should take that short story or novel and flood the publishing world with query letters. Be as careful and creative in making reparation to yourself as you were in making reparation to others.

 

This week, while I was saying the rosary, I was given an insight into the mystery of the Garden of Gethsemane. In His suffering, Jesus asked the Father if the cup of pain he was given to drink could be taken from him. He didn’t want the suffering he was given. He wanted to choose his own suffering. Don’t we do that? As writers, and as people, don’t we often create our own suffering rather than deal with the suffering we are meant to work through? Facing the suffering of our past is especially difficult. As children we used coping mechanisms that we carry over into our adult years. We may choose the suffering of addiction, to food or drugs or alcohol, etc., instead of working through the abuse we suffered as children. We may even hide our writing – allowing it to be ignored rather than fully experiencing the neglect we felt from our family. We can use the suffering we choose as a distraction from the need to fully feel and eventually forgive the suffering we didn’t choose in life.

We distract ourselves from the pain of the present also. Is the fear of facing the rejection we get as writers the suffering we can’t face? We can avoid it by reworking that story over and over again. Is the fear of attention to our work replaced by a false humility about our gift? Why is it that we writers do more harm to ourselves than others? We want to choose the suffering we can handle. Isn’t it easier to try another diet, go to another meeting, and choose our own failure, instead of living in the truth of the suffering we have been given. Let’s spend this week looking at the harm we have done to ourselves as people and as writers by trying to control our own suffering. Let’s ask God for the courage to take the cup we have been given.

We need to remember that the suffering cup we have received is the one God knows will lead to our resurrection. Personally, and in our work, we need to face the cup we are given and work our painful way through it. That will lead to our own Easter. We are followers of the Cross. As we walk through the pain of isolation and dismissal we need to know that He is with us. As we face the fear of ridicule and dismissal, we need to carry that cross, face that suffering and arise from the grave. Let’s take our cup and follow Our Savior. We have a mission of writing as He had a mission of Salvation.

So this week look at how you have harmed yourself and your writing career. Look at the distractions and suffering you have chosen instead of the suffering you were meant to work through. This week, make reparation to yourself! Next week we will move on to the next step in becoming the writer you were meant to be!

Karen Kelly Boyce is a mother of two and grandmother of two who lives on a farm in N.J. with her retired husband. She and her husband love to camp and take ‘road trips’ around the country. She has published four novels and three children’s books. Her website is www.karenkellyboyce.com

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CWG Prayer Chain Post: April 16, 2017

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

Happy Easter!

Jesus Christ is risen!

800px-Andrea_Della_Robbia_Bode_Berlin_1

Andrea della Robbia, 16th century, Bode Museum, Berlin

 


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


APRIL INTENTION PRAYER

The Gloria
Glory to God in the highest. And on earth peace to men of good will. We praise You. We bless You. We adore you. We glorify You. We give You thanks for Your great glory. O Lord God, heavenly King, God the Father almighty. O Lord Jesus Christ, the Only-begotten Son. O Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father: you Who take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us. You Who take away the sins of the world, receive our prayer. You Who sit at the right hand of the Father, have mercy on us. For you alone are holy. You alone are the Lord. You alone, O Jesus Christ, are most high. Together with the Holy Spirit in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | Leave a comment

Render Unto Uncle Sam…

jesus risenAs I reflected on what I would discuss this month, I felt called to juxtapose two familiar quotes. The first comes from a hero of the American Revolution, Benjamin Franklin, written in a letter to Jean-Baptiste Leroy in 1789. Franklin said,

“Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency; but in this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.”

If you are reading this on April 15th, I apologize if you feel as if I have poured salt into a gaping wound. I offer a prayer if you still need to file your taxes with Uncle Sam. I also commiserate if you owe money, having already bit the bullet and sent in a check for several thousand dollars. Tax day provides a painful reminder that while geniuses can make a cell phone more powerful than an old home computer, they can’t figure out a way to get rid of the IRS. Still, even if they got rid of the paperwork, the feds would find a way to take your money.

As certain as we will pay taxes, we will also die. Scriptures points to only two people, Elijah (2 Kings 2:11) and Enoch (Hebrews 11:5) who escaped death. As Catholics we celebrate the Ascension of Jesus and the Assumption of Mary, but even they had an end of life experience. There comes a point in every person’s life when one truly comes to grips with their own mortality. Unfortunately for some, that moment arrives only at their death bed. After losing five friends to cancer in the span of five years, the Lord asked me to face my mortality much earlier than most. This has defined my discipleship, formed my writing, and redirected my life.

This brings me to the next quote. They are the words of Our Lord spoken to the Pharisees in response to an attempt to trick him into taking sides either for or against the Romans.

“Then render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s; and to God the things that are God’s.” – Our Lord in Matthew 22:21.

Jesus does not fall for the trap and instead tells us to take our Father’s side. What if we applied this reasoning to Benjamin Franklin’s quote? The gold coin that bore the face of Caesar belonged to Caesar and so did the taxes the Jews had to pay, but can we extend this concept even further? What if Jesus didn’t just mean Caesar, the man, but Caesar as a representation of the world? Can Our Lord want us to give back to the world all things that are worldly?

What about the other half of both quotes? Franklin tells us death is certain but Jesus tells us to give God what is God’s. Since the power over life and death belongs to God, I ask you to consider that just as Caesar can represent the world when Jesus asks you to give up of worldly worries, Jesus is asking you to give your entire life to the Father. It belongs to God. Sell all you have and follow me (Matthew 19:21). Leave your father and mother and follow me (Luke 14:26). Let the dead bury the dead (Luke 9:60). The harsh emphasis that Jesus puts on this call is repeated throughout the Gospels.

As Christians in a secular world, we have many responsibilities that we must fulfill. These belong to “Caesar”. Jesus Christ says give your life to Him. In His wisdom, He gave us the Church and the Sacraments to strengthen us. We will struggle, we will fall, we will suffer, and we will die. Throughout all of that we will find moments of grace, be lifted out of darkness, be healed of our iniquities, and hope for eternal life. This year, symbolically, we leave both the tax season and Lent behind and enter into Easter. May we find comfort and joy in the glory of the Resurrection.

 

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | 1 Comment

CWG Book Blast – Cynthia Toney’s “6 Dates to Disaster (Bird Face series, book three”

This month, the Catholic Writers’ Guild is touring Guildie Cynthia Toney’s book, 6 Dates to Disaster (Bird Face series, book three).”  It is an SOA winner.

Teaser:6 Dates to Disaster FC 5x8

When Wendy’s family has money problems, she must find a way on her own to see Mrs. V and Sam again—but in the process will she lose everything she counted on for the future, including David?

Summary:

For her mom’s birthday, Wendy finds an old jewelry box at a flea market—the perfect gift for someone who loves salvaged junk. But inside the box is a cryptic note that appears to have been written recently. Who wrote the note, and did the intended recipient ever see it?

Wendy’s curiosity leads her on a search with boyfriend David at her side and eager to help.

But Wendy needs more personal and urgent help—the financial kind—because her stepfather has lost his job. The family’s plan to visit Alaska on vacation is headed down the sewer like a hard Louisiana rain. How will Wendy ever see Mrs. V or Sam again?

When an opportunity arrives in the form of tutoring Melissa, one of the Sticks, Wendy’s money problems appear to be solved. Until the arrangement takes a turn that gets Wendy into trouble like never before.

And in the final months of ninth grade, she might lose everything she counted on for the future.

Benefits to the Teen and the Family:

This story addresses academic honesty and communication with parents and demonstrates how abandoning either might affect a teen’s relationships and future.

“6 Dates to Disaster” is a Finalist in the Grace Awards.

Website: http://www.cynthiattoney.com

Blog:  http://birdfacewendy.wordpress.com

Facebook Author Page:  https://www.facebook.com/birdfacewendy

Goodreads:  https://www.goodreads.com/CynthiaTToney

Twitter: @CynthiaTToney

Instagram: @CynthiaTToney

Pinterest: Cynthia T. Toney, YA Author

LinkedIn:  www.linkedin.com/in/cynthiattoney

Excerpt:

A tightly folded piece of blue paper was stuck in the back corner of a drawer. I pulled it free and unfolded the bottom of a page from one of those small-sized spiral notebooks people use for journals. It had one edge of ragged paper fingers torn from the spiral, but the paper felt crisp and looked clean. Where had I seen paper like that before? I opened it.

Meet me in the park after the Mardi Gras parade. It was written in a loose, flowing script that could belong to a male or female. No signature. How odd.

My back straightened.

Someone had hidden this note. Hidden it where no one else would find it, shoving it like that to the rear corner of a drawer so small. To keep the meeting a secret without throwing away the note—and still be able to look at it again later. Or, maybe the note never arrived where it was supposed to go.

My curiosity kicked in like it had when I’d learned about a lost uncle no one in the family wanted to talk about.

Who’d written this note, and where was the person it belonged to? One thing for sure—the sender must be someone important to the recipient.

My eyes narrowed. Was the note a directive for a romantic rendezvous? An exchange of some sort? What? How did an old jewelry box wind up at the flea market with what appeared to be a new note still inside?

If the message referred to this year’s Mardi Gras parade, it was scheduled for next Saturday.

Anticipation drummed in my chest.

What if the sender or the recipient showed up at the park next Saturday and no one else came?

I threw away everything from inside the box but kept the note.

Bio:

Cynthia writes novels for preteens and teens because she wants them to know how wonderful, powerful, and valuable God made them. Her contemporary and historical fiction has twisty plots with elements of mystery and romance—because life is complicated. Ask any teen! Cynthia’s Bird Face series (so far) includes 8 Notes to a Nobody, 10 Steps to Girlfriend Status, and 6 Dates to Disaster. Her coming-of-age historical, The Other Side of Freedom, releases August, 2017. She lives in Texas with her husband and dogs.

Buy Links:

Amazon Paperback:

https://www.amazon.com/Dates-Disaster-Bird-Face/dp/1944120246/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

Amazon Kindle edition:

https://www.amazon.com/Dates-Disaster-Bird-Face-Book-ebook/dp/B01MXUMV8K/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

Barnes & Noble Paperback:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/6-dates-to-disaster-cynthia-t-toney/1125288374?ean=9781944120245

Books-a-Million Paperback:

http://www.booksamillion.com/p/Dates-Disaster/Cynthia-T-Toney/9781944120245?id=6564263577253

Tweet: Her goal is Alaska. Her family is broke. Is a chance to make money the answer to a prayer—or the road to disaster? www.amzn.com/B01MXUMV8K

Posted in Catholic book blast, Catholic Writing and Publishing, Faith, Family Life, Fiction, fiction, Juvenile fiction, Young Adult Novel | Leave a comment

Rightfully Ours, by Carolyn Astfalk

Rightfully Ours (cover), by Carolyn AstfalkRightfully Ours tells of buried gold, but more importantly, it reveals something far more precious in rural, North Central Pennsylvania.  The treasure hunters, Rachel Mueller and Paul Porter, find themselves in the Mueller’s kitchen early in the school year, flummoxed by their improbable and unforeseen encounter. Blame it on Ron Mueller, who guards Rachel, his fourteen-year-old daughter, with strict rules about dating. He quickly introduces potential boyfriends to his “three-barrel shotgun” to assure their compliance with his standards. But his response to economic pressures—leasing the southern portion of his property to a gas-mining/fracking operation and renting an in-law cottage located near his house—unwittingly creates conflict, temptation, and a compelling story.

Sixteen-year-old Paul, the brother of one of the fracking roughnecks, is Ron’s tenant. He and Rachel live next door to each other and ride the same school bus. Thrown together, Rachel’s awkwardness and Paul’s resentment keep them apart. Eventually, Paul’s teasing tells Rachel that heknows she exists. Slowly their relationship warms and later endures tragedies, misunderstandings, discoveries, and disappointments.

Paul’s unearthing of a Civil War artifact in Rachel’s garden inspires him to write the term paper of the century. As part of his research, Paul and Rachel discover something controversial and of great monetary value—something to excite history buffs and the custodians of Fort Knox.

Despite Mr. and Mrs. Mueller’s efforts to discourage teen passions, Paul and Rachel find themselves unsupervised. They weigh what is best for their short term relationship against what is more valuable in the long term. Young readers will be able to identify with Paul and Rachel as their love develops, and to feel their pain as storms tatter and threaten a far more valuable treasure, one they may soon lose.

Carolyn Astfalk brings life to the pages of her books. She fills her teen romance novel with tenderness, humor, and irony. As with Romeo and Juliette, parting with Rachel and Paul will be “sweet sorrow.”

I had the privilege to work in the Catholic Writers Guild Fiction Critique Group with Carolyn Astfalk as Rightfully Ours came to be. She shared each new chapter and eventually sent me a review copy of the completed book. I’ve enjoyed all of Carolyn’s published and unpublished novels including Ornamental Graces and Stay with Me. I am grateful for her assistance with my own efforts.

Posted in Adventure, Book Review, Catholic Fiction, Faith, Fiction, fiction, Humour, Juvenile fiction, Love, Novel, romance, suspense, Young Adult Novel | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Promise of Lent and Grace of Eastertide

Supper at Emmaus Bartolomeo Cavarozzi (Getty)

Supper at Emmaus Bartolomeo Cavarozzi (Getty)

The one who began a good work in you will continue to complete it until the day of Christ Jesus. (Phillipians 1:6)

As the end of Lent nears, we see how far we have come. And we see how far we have to go to become the holy children of God he created us to become.

God began a good work in us on Ash Wednesday and inspired us to launch out into the deep of many unknowns. The unknown of our capacity to make the change he inspired in us. The unknown of our perseverance and the strength of our expectant faith.

Coöperating with grace

What is not unknown now is that new sureness inside us that we are growing spiritually. Whatever the outcome of our Lenten resolutions, something in our spirit is urging us on to continue to coöperate with the grace poured out on us during these 40 days and abounding even more during Eastertide.

Perhaps it is the grace to continue with a new devotion, more consistent prayer time, or additional time spent pursuing spiritual wisdom or before the Blessed Sacrament. It could be a new appreciation of a food or activity we denied ourselves that we will always enjoy more because of our sacrifice this Lent. Awareness of a weakness we hadn’t recognized before can bring us the resolve to coöperate with God in strengthening our faith so that, with the help of the Lord, we will be victorious.

Growing up in the Lord

We are growing up in the Lord! Let us now look forward to the Easter season and all the beauty, glory and new life springing up around us and praise God for the beauty, glory and new life budding in our soul.

The one who began a good work in you will continue to complete it until the day of Christ Jesus. (Phillipians 1:6)

What good work that God began in you during Lent will you continue after Easter?

© 2017 Nancy H C Ward

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CWG Prayer Chain Post: April 9, 2017

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

Philippians 2:6-11

Who, being in the form of God, did not count equality with God something to be grasped. But he emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, becoming as human beings are; and being in every way like a human being, he was humbler yet, even to accepting death, death on a cross. And for this God raised him high, and gave him the name which is above all other names; so that all beings in the heavens, on earth and in the underworld, should bend the knee at the name of Jesus and that every tongue should acknowledge Jesus Christ as Lord, to the glory of God the Father.


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


APRIL INTENTION PRAYER

The Gloria
Glory to God in the highest. And on earth peace to men of good will. We praise You. We bless You. We adore you. We glorify You. We give You thanks for Your great glory. O Lord God, heavenly King, God the Father almighty. O Lord Jesus Christ, the Only-begotten Son. O Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father: you Who take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us. You Who take away the sins of the world, receive our prayer. You Who sit at the right hand of the Father, have mercy on us. For you alone are holy. You alone are the Lord. You alone, O Jesus Christ, are most high. Together with the Holy Spirit in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | Leave a comment

When Picking up Your Pen Is Picking up Your Cross

By Janice Lane Palko

How do you regard your writing career? Perhaps you’re like me. I’ve been putting words on paper for more than 20 years, and I’ve always regarded my propensity to write as a being a blessing and as a calling of sorts. I wrote last month how God and, to a lesser extent, we humans can take something meant for harm and turn it into good. My writing has been a blessing wrought from misery.

I’m a natural-born worrier. Some families seem to pass on the proclivity to become addicted to alcohol, drugs, or gambling while others seem to be prone to divorce or commit suicide, but my family’s fatal foible is to fret. We are world-class worriers. After my third and last child was born, now nearly 25 years ago, I began to experience panic attacks. At first, I didn’t know what was happening to me, but as a worrier, I, of course, assumed it had to be something catastrophic like a brain tumor. After consulting my family doctor and a visit to a therapist, it became apparent that I was under too much stress—a lot of which I was putting upon myself. In addition to having three small children at the time and getting no sleep and experiencing several family health crises, I have a vivid imagination. As such, I realized through some introspection and prayer, that I was using my God-given imagination to terrorize myself. For instance, if I saw a carjacking on the news, I would cast myself as a victim and play out the scenario in detail in my mind of what it would be like to be taken captive and held by brutal criminals.

Through prayer, reprioritizing my things in my life, and discovering that I could terrorize people on the page through writing instead of myself, I found a happier, more peaceful, and more productive life. That’s why I’ve always viewed my writing career as a blessing in my life. It refocused my mind on more productive things.

During this Lent, however, I’ve come to another perspective–one that seems contradictory since I love writing so much. I’ve become aware that writing may also be my cross. Not to trivialize Jesus’s passion and death by comparing it to the life of a writer, but when you are a writer, life is not all sunshine and roses. There is suffering. How many of us could paper the walls with rejection slips? How many of us have had a piece you’ve sweated over fall flat? How many of us have looked at a paltry royalty check and wondered if it’s all worth it? How many of us have watched as books like Fifty Shades of Grey soar to the top of the bestseller’s list while our writing attempts to edify and inspire bump along the bottom of the Amazon charts? How many of us have put in a full day’s work or spent all day taking care of a home and children only to use what little “me time” there is to eke out some writing?

In writing this piece, I did some research on what it means for Catholics to “take up their cross.” It seems that passage of scripture is often difficult to define, but I like this thought on it that Saint Pope John Paul II gave during World Youth Day in 2001.

“As the cross can be reduced to being an ornament, ‘to carry the cross’ can become just a manner of speaking. In the teaching of Jesus, however, it does not imply the pre-eminence of mortification and denial. It does not refer primarily to the need to endure patiently the great and small tribulations of life, or, even less, to the exaltation of pain as a means of pleasing God. It is not suffering for its own sake that a Christian seeks, but love. When the cross is embraced, it becomes a sign of love and of total self-giving. To carry it behind Christ means to be united with him in offering the greatest proof of love.”

Like the proverbial double-edge sword, I’ve come to see my writing as both a blessing and a cross much as Jesus’s cross is both a curse as it spelled suffering and death and yet, at the same time, was the greatest sign of His love for us. Suffering and love are always intertwined.

Therefore, as we come to another Easter, I’m going to dwell less on the suffering endured as a writer and strive to be more like Jesus and take up my cross and offer everything I put on the page as a great proof of love.

Posted in Catholic Theme, Catholic Writing and Publishing, Encouragement for Writers, Faith, Family Life, Hope, Inspirational, Spiritual Life, The Writing Life | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments