Committees support CWCL16

CWCO_live_smThe excitement in the air grows as we anticipate Catholic Writers Conference Live! CWCL16 is set for July 26-July 29, 2016, in Chicago. The work of many committees supports the conference. During the CWG Meeting and Welcome Session – open to all – the officers, led by President Joe Wetterling, will show what the CWG is all about. I’ll speak up during one part of the presentation, giving an overview of committees and how members can participate:

Blog: Read book reviews, inspiration for writers, committee news, president’s message. Volunteer to write or edit articles for the blog. Contact Kathryn Cunningham or Dennis McGeehan at blog@catholicwritersguild.com

Catholic Arts and Letters Award: CALA is our awards competition for works of fiction of outstanding merit. A book must have our Seal of Approval to compete. Volunteer to help organize or judge the competition. Contact Carol Ann Chybowski at calacontest@catholicwritersguild.com

Catholic Book News: This monthly mailing to readers, bookstores and others in the publishing industry features two SoA books. Add your local Catholic bookstore to the list. Contact Dawn Witzke, booknews@catholicwritersguild.com

Conferences: We produce two writers’ conferences per year. Contact Ann Lewis and Karina Fabian

  • The Catholic Writers Conference Online is a webinar conference open to all writers Catholic and non-Catholic. Volunteer to give a presentation or help facilitate speakers and discussions. Contact cwgonline@catholicwritersguild.com
  • The Catholic Writers Conference Live is held in conjunction with the Catholic Marketing Network (CMN) Trade Show. Volunteer to help with registration and trade show booths, or introduce and assist presenters. Contact: cwglive@catholicwritersguild.com

Facebook group page: Start up discussions on all aspects of writing, marketing, faith, social action, or just socializing. Contact Karina Fabian at facebookpage@catholicwritersguild.com

Membership: Check your membership status or renewal date: Contact Maureen Smith, membership@catholicwritersguild.com

Public Relations: Volunteer to help with new media push with regular tweeting, Facebook posts and blogging to promote CWG activities. Contact Nancy Ward, CoordinatorofCommittees@catholicwritersguild.com

Retreat: Plan to attend the next one in October 2017 – combining the classic Catholic retreat with a writer’s retreat that encourages us to create on the spot. Contact Ann Lewis or Margaret Rose Realy, retreat@catholicwritersguild.com

Seal of Approval: SOA is a program for getting your book evaluated and approved for its Catholicity and quality. The Seal of Approval is a signal to Catholic bookstores that they can carry your book without concern about its content or quality. Volunteer to be trained to evaluate books for the Seal of Approval. Contact Ellen Hrkach, soa@catholicwritersguild.com

Speakers Bureau/Education – List your credentials as a speaker. Look for opportunities to refer schools, civic and church groups to this resource. Contact Dennis McGeehan, education@catholicwritersguild.com

Website – Get your news on the CWG home page–just send a media release to Ann Lewis, website@catholicwritersguild.com

Zenit selects articles from the CWG Blog and recommends them for publication on Zenit.com. Announced on Facebook group page. Contact Dennis McGeehan, zenit@catholicwritersguild.com

Critique groups: work with others to improve your writing.

  • Fiction: A guild within the Guild where CWG members assist each other in writing and launching their creations. For details or an invitation to join, send a message to Don Mulcare, FictionGroup@catholicwritersguild.com
  • Non-fiction: We critique each other’s work via email, using mark-up, offering suggestions about rewrites, organization and marketing. For guidelines, contact Nancy Ward at NonfictionGroup@catholicwritersguild.com

For more information on committees, contact Nancy Ward, CoordinatorofCommittees@catholicwritersguild.com

Posted in Catholic Writers Conference Live, Catholic Writing and Publishing, Committees, CWG member benefits, CWG Needs Volunteers | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

CWG announces CALA finalists

CALA award color2smIt is with great excitement that the Catholic Writers Guild announces our finalists for the 2016 Catholic Arts and Letters Award for Fiction! We want to thank all of you who entered the contest. Our judges had many terrific things to say about all the entries this year. The quality was remarkable, and we truly appreciate your dedication to Catholic fiction.

Our finalists in the category of Adult Fiction are:
Catholic Philosopher Chick #2 Rebecca Weiss and Regina Doman
The Lion’s Heart  by Dena Hunt
The Watson Chronicles by Ann Margaret Lewis

Our finalists in the category of YA/Children are:
The Tree of Healing by Diana Tabbaa
A World Such as Heaven Intended by Amanda Lauer
I Am Margaret by Corinna Turner

The winners of the CALA will be announced July 28th at the Thursday morning breakfast sponsored by CMN at the CMN Trade Show in Schaumburg, Illinois. For information on attending this show or to register, please go to www.catholicwritersconference.com

Again, thanks to all of you for entering the CALA and God bless you!

Carol Ann Chybowski, CALA Committee Chair

Posted in Catholic Fiction, Catholic Writers Conference Live, Catholic Writing and Publishing, Committees, Fiction | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Embrace Fear, Celebrate Failure

Thomas Edison understood that failure is a great teacher. Each time an experiment failed to yield the desired result, he moved one step closer to success.

I personally felt a huge accomplishment after I served as a cantor for the first time at my church. Before and during, I was scared and sweating bullets. But I learned I could do it, and even if I made a mistake, I would survive. After the Mass, the feeling of accomplishment was huge. Now, years later, I have sung at hundreds of Masses, including special diocesan-wide celebrations. It is always an honor and a joy to serve as a cantor. I am able to do it only because, one time, I stepped forward, even though I was petrified.

Freelancing offers writers many opportunities to expand their earnings — writing (blogs, magazine articles, books, etc.), editing (content, line, proofreading, etc.), speaking, and more. Yet most freelancers choose to work within a small domain, mostly because they feel comfortable there.

“I don’t know enough about it to do it” is the normal excuse.

Yes, but you can learn!

“I’m afraid to do it.”

Sounds like an opportunity to grow.

Catholic Writers Guild member Jane Lebak offers the following sage advice she learned from another: “Do one scary thing each day.”

Often, what is holding back our writing careers is that thing we are afraid to confront. By forming a habit of doing one scary thing each day, or even one a week, we begin to eliminate those obstacles in our life.

What are you afraid to do?

Is it sending out a query letter to that top-ranked publisher? Is it tackling a sensitive subject in your writing that you feel called to address? Is it volunteering to work a conference?

We never know what opportunities will present themselves when we step out of our comfort zone.

Go on! Embrace the fear. You may even succeed!

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | Leave a comment

The Twelve Steps to Being a Spiritual Writer

thumbnailrosarykeyboard

Step Four – Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves as writers and of our writing.

 

The first three steps that we have completed have been spiritual. They have all been about our relationship with God. Now we are moving into an action step. We are called to take a hard and honest look at ourselves as writers. In any business, inventory is necessary. It is never a treasured job. It is not something that business owners look forward to. However, in order to keep a business on the right track, a regular inventory is always necessary. It is how the business owner finds what works and what doesn’t work. It is the inventory that keeps the owner honest. For example, perhaps the owner of the corner deli loves sour cream potato chips. Because of his love of these tasty chips he ordered twice the amount of this flavor potato chip and just half that amount of barbecue flavored chips. He is sure that the chips will sell well. However, an honest inventory shows that he has run short of the popular barbecue chips and has numerous bags of sour cream chips reaching their expiration date. The inventory is the truth.

The truth is that people in his neighborhood prefer the barbecue chips. Now he can adjust his next order to reflect this truth. He can put the sour cream chips on sale before their expiration date and not waste his time and money trying to convince his customers to change their taste. It is an honest appraisal that has made this all possible. His business will grow with less waste. He will thrive because he is living in truth.

As Spiritual Writers, it is more important for us, as representatives of the Christian way, to live in truth. After all, we influence our readers. We represent the truth of Christ to our fans. How can we do that if we don’t live the Christian life ourselves? No, we can’t be perfect, but we can be closer to the Christ we follow. We need His grace to change, but we have to do our part. Let’s start with ourselves as writers. We will deal with our actual writing work later.

When I wrote my first “Sisters of the Last Straw” book, each character was based on a friend from my Bible study. We had been meeting for thirty years. We knew each other so well that we had learned to laugh at our weaknesses and foibles. I exaggerated the faults in each character to make them lovable and funny and anxiously awaited seeing my five friends and their reaction to the initial reading. What shocked me was that each woman had trouble figuring out which nun was based on her. No one sees their own character defects. Our personal image of ourselves is often false. You may think you know what is good and what is bad about yourself as a person or a writer. I am here to tell you that you can’t see yourself as God sees you.

All of us are sinners! And what is a sinner but a sick person that God wants to heal with His love. We can’t heal ourselves as writers until we take an inventory of the illness we have been carrying around. We have flaws that we can’t see until we take an honest look at ourselves. This is not something that you have to share with anyone but God. He already knows all about you, so the only one you have been dishonest with is yourself. Let’s start a truthful inventory of our writing resentments. Being writers – we’ll put them down on paper. Let’s make a list of those people, institutions and principles that have made us angry.  Let’s examine what it is about them that made us angry. Let’s open the wounds to the light so they can be healed. You can make your list in the order of the amount of anger, or in chronological order of your life as a writer. Let’s face it. We have all been hurt. As writers we try to hide the pain and act professional. As good Christians we have learned to stuff our pain down with false humility and skin – deep forgiveness. But to allow God to heal our hearts we have to open our hearts and let his light in. We have to look at the pain and find our part in the pain. Here is an example of how to do the inventory.

I am resentful at: Mr. Know-it-all

The Cause: He ignored me after the conference, not taking the time to talk to me.

It affected my: (Pick one or more) Self-esteem, pocketbook, ambition, personal relationship, fear.

Another example:

I am resentful at: Howdy Doody Publishing

The Cause: Returned my manuscript unread

It affected my: (Pick one or more) Self-esteem, pocketbook, ambition, personal relationship, fear.

Another example:

I am resentful at: My mother

The Cause: Laughed at my desire to be a writer

It affected my: (Pick one or more) Self-esteem, pocketbook, ambition, personal relationship, fear.

Each morning, pray to God, asking Him to reveal the writing resentments you have pushed down. He will reveal many which you have forgotten, but are simmering deep within. Do this for two weeks and you will be surprised at what you discover. I know I was. It is the first step to allowing God to heal you and make you the writer you were meant to be.

Karen Kelly Boyce is a mother of two and grandmother of two who lives on a farm in N.J. with her retired husband. She and her husband love to camp and take ‘road trips’ around the country. She has published four novels and three children’s books. Her website is www.karenkellyboyce.com

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

CWG Prayer Chain Post: June 26, 2016

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

Psalms 16:1-2, 5, 7-8, 9-10, 11

Protect me, O God, in you is my refuge. To Yahweh I say, ‘You are my Lord, my happiness is in none. My birthright, my cup is Yahweh; you, you alone, hold my lot secure. I bless Yahweh who is my counsellor, even at night my heart instructs me. I keep Yahweh before me always, for with him at my right hand, nothing can shake me. So my heart rejoices, my soul delights, my body too will rest secure, for you will not abandon me to Sheol, you cannot allow your faithful servant to see the abyss. You will teach me the path of life, unbounded joy in your presence, at your right hand delight for ever.


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


JUNE INTENTION PRAYER 

A Prayer For a Family

O dear Jesus,
I humbly implore You to grant Your special graces to our family.
May our home be the shrine of peace, purity, love, labor and faith.
I beg You, dear Jesus, to protect and bless all of us, absent and present, living
and dead.

O Mary,
loving Mother of Jesus,
and our Mother,
pray to Jesus for our family,
for all the families of the world,
to guard the cradle of the newborn,
the schools of the young and their vocations.

Blessed Saint Joseph,
holy guardian of Jesus and Mary,
assist us by your prayers
in all the necessities of life.
Ask of Jesus that special grace
which He granted to you,
to watch over our home
at the pillow of the sick and the dying,
so that with Mary and with you,
heaven may find our family unbroken
in the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

Amen.

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | Leave a comment

You Were Here, by Cori McCarthy

In an act of celebration, bravado, or maybe alcohol-induced insanity, Jake Strangelove stands on the top pipe of the playground swing set, still wearing his graduation gown. He backflips as he had done so many times before, but this time, he lands on his neck. Five years later, Jake’s life and death still haunt his family, especially his sister Jaycee and dozens of their friends.

Cori McCarthy explores Jaycee’s mangled life and that of her companions as they mark the fifth anniversary of Jakes leap into mortality. Fortunately, Natalie Cheng, daughter of an Ohio University psychologist, provides a running commentary on the mental state of Jake and his mourners.

Jake was left-handed, ADHD, and more than a little dyslectic. “Kids with learning disabilities often act out because of their frustration.” Professor Cheng told Natalie, “The neural insulation of your frontal lobe won’t be finished developing until you’re in your mid-twenties. You’re not fully aware of the consequences of your actions.” No wonder insurance companies want to charge higher rates for drivers under the age of twenty-five. Jake and all sub-mid-twenties humans remain half-baked when it comes to filtering out destructive impulses.

Jaycee Strangelove describes herself as a damaged girl with no hobbies, no passions, and no future. In fact, she shares a hobby with her late brother and Mik, one of their friends: Urbex or urban exploration.  Specifically, they visit the ruins of The Ridges, a shuttered, gothic, perhaps haunted insane asylum, Randall Park Mall a once illustrious but now abandoned shopping center, Geauga Lake, the shambles of what had been a huge amusement park and two other sites regularly explored by Jake. Their goal is to find traces of Jake’s presence—messages he left behind to commemorate his acts of daring.

The adventures begin on the night of Jaycee’s high school graduation. She drags along her classmates, Natalie, Zach, and Bishop. Mik meets them inside The Ridges’ dusty, relic strewn “lobotomy-central”–the first stop in the summer hunt for Jake-signs across the state of Ohio.

Cori McCarthy enlists the graphic artist Sonia Liao to speak for Mik and Bishop. Mik, a selective mute rarely verbalizes, so the chapters he narrates—appearing as portions of a graphic novel—uniquely link the prose chapters and amplify the noir quality of the novel. Bishop, a graffiti aficionado, summarizes moods of the moment throughout the book.

The characters represent tortured souls with no spiritual framework and no help from their families. Bishop grieves his lost lover after her cruel rejection. Natalie calculates how she will dump Zach although she still craves his bed. More and more, Zach takes refuge in alcohol. Jaycee lives to reunite with Jake while Mik, in many ways acts as a superhero but can’t even whisper his feelings for Jaycee. All of them have secrets involving Jake and his death that they may or may not divulge during the critical summer between high school graduation and the college-induced diaspora.

Can Cori McCarthy write her way out of this corner? What could reconcile and normalize the strains and unspoken yearnings before the last sunset of summer?

 

Posted in Adventure, Book Review, fiction, Novel, Reviews, suspense, Young Adult Novel | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Saved by the Mercy of a Stranger

 

Photo Credit: Eric Genius

Photo Credit: Eric Genius

We cannot escape the Lord’s words to us, and they will serve as the criteria upon which we are judged: whether we have fed the hungry and given drink to the thirsty, welcomed the stranger and clothed the naked, or spent time with the sick and those in prison (cf. Mt 25: 31-45). Moreover, we will be asked if we have helped others to escape the doubt that causes them to fall into despair and which is often a source of loneliness. Pope Francis, Misericordia Vultus, par. 15.

Things were dire and, once again, I was begging God for a miracle for my eldest son. Addiction had reasserted its grip on him, and his life was quickly spinning out of control. What I never expected was that the miracle would come through a virtual stranger—a piano virtuoso and acclaimed composer who travels the world “getting his hands dirty” by reaching out with mercy to the lonely, the imprisoned, and the lost.

Eric Genuis and I had met only once at a conference in Texas, where we spoke very briefly about our sons’ struggles. “I’m going to reach out to your son,” Eric offered spontaneously. “I know what it’s like to have a child that’s hurting and to be bleeding over that child while the whole world pretends everything is ‘fine.’”

That was the first—and at the time only—conversation I ever had with Eric, and quite honestly, I didn’t expect him to follow up. Shortly thereafter I began a novena to St. Joseph, asking the patron saint of families to intervene to save my son, Christian. On day nine of the novena—the Feast of St. Joseph and the same day my late husband, Bernie, was buried—I received a phone call from Christian. “Some stranger just called me out of the blue and talked to me for 45 minutes. He told me that I need to get help, that I can do it, and he offered to help me in any way he could. I had a moment of grace, Mom, like I hadn’t experienced in months.   I’m going to get help today. I’m not waiting any longer.”

That day—that one conversation with a stranger named Eric Genuis—jump-started the process that would land Christian safely in Communita Cenacolo, a Catholic community for recovering addicts. A week after that miraculous day, Eric drove six hours to personally meet with Christian to remind him that he is good, that he is loved by a God who is constantly calling him to respond to something deeper, and to encourage him to let go of everything that inhibits his growth in God.

“We hide our vulnerabilities to the point of neurosis in our society and we suffer in silence,” Eric has since shared passionately during one of our phone conversations. “I firmly believe that’s the root of one of the scourges of our culture—the loneliness and isolation we experience when we are suffering. We’ve got to do more than just say: ‘God bless you, I’ll pray for you.’ We have to engage!”

Engage Eric does, as he travels the world ministering over one hundred concerts a year to “the forgotten of society” with breathtaking original classical musical compositions via his “Concerts For Hope”.

“I hope to facilitate a powerful encounter with beauty and goodness to ‘the least in society’ in order to elevate their human condition, bring inspiration, recognize their innate dignity and give hope,” explains Eric. For the past fifteen years, his audiences have included those in detention centers, rehab facilities, nursing homes, and prisons, as well as those in private homes, churches and at Catholic conferences.

What motivates this man, who lives on a small farm in Kentucky with his wife and four children (several of whom have special needs) to help so many others? “When I was a child, the Bible story that really got my attention was the Parable of the Good Samaritan, which I begged my parents to read over and over again,” explains Eric. “Two people walked by the wounded man, too busy and distracted to help. I don’t want to walk past anyone that God puts in my path. I want to be attentive at all times to what God is asking of me, even when there are no standing ovations, no letters of gratitude, no accolades.”

No standing ovations came after Eric’s meeting with my own beloved son—but Christian’s life was rerouted toward saving grace thanks to a good Samaritan who stopped to minister to his wounds. Moreover, my own heart was profoundly touched by Eric’s mercy, as I was reminded once again that God hears and answers the cries of the poor—especially the cries of poor, desperate parents who suffer, like Eric, me and so many others—over the pain of our hurting children.

This article was previously published at Aleteia and is reprinted here with permission.

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing, Faith, Mercy, Year of Mercy | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Shelter

Paris, France, City, Cities, Urban

You may or may not be familiar with the phrase “road trip” depending on your age.  That phrase, though, defined a generation and coined many phrases that are in the American lexicon of nostalgia.  There was a time when friends or family got into their car and were not perfectly sure of their accommodations for the night.  A detour, mistake or too leisurely a pace could lead to the roll up to a motel only to see the dreaded “NO VACANCY” sign brightly lit.  Those were the days of no cell phones and long before Kayak or Hotels.com ever existed.  It was a time when even a short journey could be a risk.  

Life’s journey could also be described in similar ways.  There are times when staying close to home is the best choice, and there are times when a journey to an unfamiliar place is necessary.  Sometimes we have the perfect route or plan, and other times it all comes unglued and we are left stranded with no one to help us or keep us safe.  There are times when we are sure that death of one kind or another is imminent. Sometimes the trip is impromptu and full of dangers we never counted on.  Sometimes the worst is real and our soul takes a beating we don’t know how to recover from.  There seems to be no shelter from the ongoing storm, no place to heal.   

The journey can be full of joy too, surprises we never counted on, new friends and things to treasure.  But what about the “bumpy ride”- the part of the trip that never seems to find that straight road?  I guess that depends on who your travel companion is.   Who is in the “shot gun” seat?  If it’s God who is your co-pilot, pay closer attention.  Besides all of the things that were said and done when Jesus was with us, there is an even richer reality of who the Father is.  This is one of the important points that shows us the necessity of doing the work that it takes to get to know the Trinity.  In a stunning example, we recognize that as far as the journey is concerned, God offers us his endless hospitality, and that particular hospitality heals and teaches us how to continue to minister with an open heart no matter what the circumstances appear to be.    

Sometimes He calls us to a particular kind of journey.  It might not even be one that we are looking forward to.   Even when it seems that the “trip” has gone off of the rails and is heading nowhere though, God still accompanies.  He never denies his wisdom, support, direction, companionship.  His will to spend endless time with us never changes.  It’s we who change.  Sometimes we turn our back, we ignore the directions, we don’t like the answer we’ve gotten.  It’s always us, though, who leave, not God who leaves us.  He shelters our will, our spirit, our ego, our heart no matter where we have traveled physically or emotionally.   As far as his children are concerned, the ability to shelter with him is always there for us.  In the economy of God, the “Vacancy” sign is always lit. No cell phone connection, no reservations, no problem!  Road trip!!!!

 

©2016, Kathryn M. Cunningham

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CWG Prayer Chain Post: June 19, 2016

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

Galatians 3:26-29

For all of you are the children of God, through faith, in Christ Jesus, since every one of you that has been baptised has been clothed in Christ. There can be neither Jew nor Greek, there can be neither slave nor freeman, there can be neither male nor female — for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And simply by being Christ’s, you are that progeny of Abraham, the heirs named in the promise.

 


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


JUNE INTENTION PRAYER 

A Prayer For a Family

O dear Jesus,
I humbly implore You to grant Your special graces to our family.
May our home be the shrine of peace, purity, love, labor and faith.
I beg You, dear Jesus, to protect and bless all of us, absent and present, living
and dead.

O Mary,
loving Mother of Jesus,
and our Mother,
pray to Jesus for our family,
for all the families of the world,
to guard the cradle of the newborn,
the schools of the young and their vocations.

Blessed Saint Joseph,
holy guardian of Jesus and Mary,
assist us by your prayers
in all the necessities of life.
Ask of Jesus that special grace
which He granted to you,
to watch over our home
at the pillow of the sick and the dying,
so that with Mary and with you,
heaven may find our family unbroken
in the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

Amen.

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | Leave a comment

CWG Book Blast: “Infinite Space, Infinite God II,” by Karina Fabian

This month, the Catholic Writers’ Guild is touring Guildie Karina Fabian’s book, INFINITE SPACE, INFINITE GOD IIIt is a SOA winner.

Teaser: Twelve science fiction stories featuring great adventure with a twist of faith.

InfiniteSpaceII_med-201x300

Summary: Twelve science fiction stories featuring great adventure with a twist of faith. Infinite Space, Infinite God II spans the gamut of science fiction, from near-future dystopias to time travel to space opera, puzzles of logic to laugh-out-loud humor and against-the-clock suspense. A great read for any science fiction fan; a must-read for those seeking something new in their fiction.

If you enjoy science fiction that recognizes faith, especially the Catholic faith, as an integral part of human society, you’ll love ISIG II. However, Karina has another surprise coming in September: Discovery, the first Rescue Sisters novel, starring the three sisters of the Order of Our Lady of the Rescue as they travel to the edge of the solar system to explore an alien spacecraft.

To get all the news, plus chances to win prized, writing tips and great articles and stories from all her worlds, join her newsletter, FabianSpace. http://eepurl.com/dc-8M

Website: http://fabianspace.com

Excerpt: In the glasses, Rita saw the screen before them—the ship, the ginger-root-shaped asteroid two hours away, the star field beyond that. Jupiter, she knew, was somewhere behind and below. Overlaid on the scene was a targeting reticule of double circle and cross-hairs, and to the lower right, a legend. She had enough time to notice the asteroid was called Guangzhou and had a small, automated mining station before she heard Ann call “Heads-up” to activate her own display. Ann muttered a couple of commands, and the tracking reticule began to move, widen and narrow to the movement of her eyes.

Annie spoke. “Interface systems green. I have control of the tow line. Ready when you are, Tommie.”

Roger. Moving in slow and oblique. Lady of Loreto, pray for us.”

Bio: Winner of the 2010 INDIE for best Fantasy (Magic, Mensa and Mayhem), Karina Fabian has imagination that takes quirky twists that keep her–and her fans–amused. Nuns working in space, a down-and-out Faerie dragon working off a geas from St. George, zombie exterminators—there’s always a surprise in Fabian’s worlds. Mrs. Fabian teaches writing and book marketing seminars, but mostly is concerned with supporting her husband, Rob Fabian, as he makes the exciting leap from military officer to civilian executive, getting her kids through high school and college, and surviving daily circuit torture…er, circuit training. Read about her adventures at http://fabianspace.com.

Buy Link: https://www.amazon.com/Infinite-Space-God-II/dp/1606192310

Tweet: Infinite Space, Infinite God II expands the role of faith thru the endless possibilities of the sci-fi genre  https://www.amazon.com/Infinite-Space-God-II/dp/1606192310

Posted in Catholic book blast, Catholic Fiction, Catholic Theme, Faith, fiction | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment