CWG Prayer Chain Post: September 25, 2016

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

Psalms 146:7, 8-9, 9-10

(Yahweh) gives justice to the oppressed, gives food to the hungry; Yahweh sets prisoners free. Yahweh gives sight to the blind, lifts up those who are bowed down. Yahweh protects the stranger, he sustains the orphan and the widow. Yahweh loves the upright,but he frustrates the wicked. Yahweh reigns for ever, your God, Zion, from age to age.


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


SEPTEMBER INTENTION PRAYER 

Prayer to St. Michael the Archangel

Saint Michael the Archangel,
defend us in battle.
Be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil.
May God rebuke him, we humbly pray;
and do Thou, O Prince of the Heavenly Host –
by the Divine Power of God –
cast into hell, satan and all the evil spirits,
who roam throughout the world seeking the ruin of souls.

Amen

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | Leave a comment

Twelve Steps to being a Spiritual Writer

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Step Four – Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves as writers and of our writing.

Our writing is a direct reflection of the way we live our life. It doesn’t matter whether we write science fiction or theology books, the way we think and the way we live is reflected in our work. Many of us, including myself, had a renewal of faith after a fall from grace. Even those of us who never wavered in our faith have grown in strength and grace over the years. None of us are perfect and we carry our patterns of sin and our past with us. We pray to be good examples to others. We ask God to give us the grace to be a reflection of His Love. However, as humans we often fail. Why? It is often because instead of looking at our past mistakes and our questionable character traits, we push them down. We want to forget our sins and our sorry ways. We think we should just move on and try to do better. While this might be true in one sense, it is a mistake. We should forget the shame that we feel about our behavior and take a good hard look at it. That is the way to learn. Examining our patterns is the only way to change them. “An unexamined life is not worth living” was first published in Plato’s work “Apology.” Spoken by Socrates, it still holds true today. So let’s examine our life as writers.

First let’s look at our behavior as writers. Next post we will examine our writing itself.  Let’s take a look at the harms that we may have done because of our resentments and fears. In a step by step fashion, let’s examine the harms that our sins of admission and sins of omission may have done to others. It is amazing how taking the harm we admit, and the harm we have buried, into the light helps us heal.  Putting our failings on paper opens our hearts to the truth. It works if we look at our life since childhood to the present, leading us to see ourselves and our failings in the light. I highly recommend that with guidance we all do this. However, for our purpose here we will stick to our writing life. It is not easy to face the truth about our past and our leanings to non-Christian conduct. However, we will never grow spiritually if we don’t examine our patterns of behavior. You cannot be a spiritual writer if you are not a spiritual person. You cannot be a Christian author if you don’t live what you write.

As writers, we use words, both for good and for evil. Let’s look at examples of how our words may have harmed others. You may wonder how you, as a writer, could have hurt another. I found that I did it, both being aware and unaware of the harm I was doing. I found that I, just as any non-Christian writer, was drawn by the temptations for recognition, money and success. I could easily fall into the trap of thinking that I was in charge of my own writing career. I need to be better than that. I stumble. I fail. But at least I now try to be brutally honest with myself. It has helped me to admit my mistakes and recognize my sin patterns. I hope it has helped me become a better person. Let’s look at our sins of admission first. Here are a few examples for you to think about.

  1. Have you ever given another writer a low rating on Amazon when you knew they deserved a better score?
  2. Have you given a tough review to another writer because you were jealous?
  3. Do you ever talk against another’s work, or dismiss their work as uninspired?
  4. Have you ever talked against someone to a publisher or distributer to promote your own career?
  5. Have you ever plagiarized? Or stolen another writer’s idea or inspiration?
  6. Have you ignored the needs of other writers or denied them the promotion or help they may want?
  7. Do you talk against editors who offered honest and constructive criticisms of your work?
  8. Do you talk against publishers who turned your writing down?
  9. Do you routinely give negative feedback to young aspirating writers, hoping to discourage competition or natural talent?

These are just some of the actual harms we may have done consciously or unconsciously. Then there are the harms of omission.

  1. Have you ignored the needs of others, never promoting or writing the reviews that all writers need?
  2. Have you shared your gifts at seminars or writing groups to help new writers or those who need encouragement or advice?
  3. Have you gone out of your way to network for another author?
  4. Have you given publication news or advice to those who were searching?
  5. Have you ever recommended another writer to a publisher?
  6. Did you take the time to write “comments” on the blogs of writers who are struggling to create a following?
  7. Have you taken the time to ‘like’ another writer’s webpage or blog?
  8. Have you excluded another writer from a social gathering of writers or failed to offer a simple invitation to join in conversation?
  9. Did you ever fail to praise or encourage other writers because you were too busy trying to promote yourself?
  10. Have you promised reviews that you failed to deliver?
  11. Do you routinely fail to “share” the promotional news of others because you just want to promote yourself?
  12. Do you criticize or nitpick other artists to sooth your own sense of insecurity?

Wow! It’s not easy to take a truthful look at yourself as a writer! It is not easy to see or admit our own failings. How do we change? Of course we can’t change ourselves. We need the grace of God and prayer to change. The first step is being brutally honest.

Here is an easy form to use as you examine what harms you have done in your writing life:

  1. I harmed (who)
  2. By doing  (what)
  3. I did it because this action added to (My self esteem, pocketbook, emotional security, ambition, personal relations)
  4. What should I have done differently, and what will I do in the future?
  5. The character defect that allowed me to do the harm in #2 was because I was – (Selfish, dishonest, self-seeking, frightened, inconsiderate, or others)

 

Pray about this, meditate each morning. Ask God to show you your failings. Then burn the papers and go to confession. Confession gives us the strength we need to do better the next time that situation comes up.  Next week we will move on to the resentments, fears and harms that affect our writing itself.

Karen Kelly Boyce is a mother of two and grandmother of two who lives on a farm in N.J. with her retired husband. She and her husband love to camp and take ‘road trips’ around the country. She has published four novels and three children’s books. Her website is www.karenkellyboyce.com

 

 

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Feast of Pontius Pilate, by E. Ann McIntyre

JC_PP_Front_Cover_Red

Who would have thought that any of the Gospel villains would merit a feast on the liturgical calendar or have churches erected in their memory? Believe it or not, the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church considers Pontius Pilate and his wife, Claudia to be saints. A clear case for Claudia begins in the scriptures where she urges Pontius to have nothing to do with the trial of Jesus, but where does the road begin for Pilate’s conversion?

 

The canonical and apocryphal gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, the writings of Flavius Josephus, the letters of Pontius Pilate, the Report of Pilate to Emperor Tiberius, concerning Jesus Christ, and other documents provide the substance from which the fertile imagination of Ann McIntyre traces Pilate’s spiritual journey.

 

As in her previous novel Lazarus of Bethany, the author inserts backstory—logical links that fill gaps in the scriptural accounts. The upper room used during the Last Supper becomes the Jerusalem home of Zebedee and his sons. McIntyre more completely develops scriptural characters including Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea. The Centurion seeking a cure for his servant as Jesus enters Capernaum becomes the same Centurion at the execution and resurrection of Jesus. She expands the role of Cornelius, visited by Peter in the Acts of the Apostles.

 

Emperor Tiberius reluctantly posts Pilate as Prefect of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea, placing him on notice that any failure in his management could result in his execution. The enmity of Tiberius comes despite his family connection to Claudia. Pressure on Pilate increases with the constant complaints to Rome by Chief Priest Caiaphas. The condemnation and execution of Jesus place Pilate in a no-win situation. Leniency would allow Caiaphas to say that Pilate “is no friend to Caesar,” but the crucifixion of Jesus also blackens Pilate’s record with Tiberius. As Pilate dispatches a report of the execution, a letter from Tiberius arrives, asking for Jesus to become his personal healer.

 

McIntyre adds a spiritual dimension to her description of the treatment of Jesus before and during his execution—details that enrich meditation, especially during Holy Week.  She nicely exposes Caiaphas’ bribes to cover-up Jesus’ resurrection and seamlessly links the several appearances of Jesus after his resurrection, inserting visits with Claudia and Pilate. Pilate waffles in his belief until disaster strikes.

 

Pilate’s slaughter of Samaritan’s insurgents gives the Governor of Syria the opportunity to replace him with his own man from North Africa. According to the Acts of Pilate, the Emperor orders Pilate to kill himself. Some accounts say that Christ appears to Pilate saving his life and confirming his conversion.

 

Although historical fiction, at times The Feast of Pontius Pilate reads like an action-adventure thriller. The story flows logically as narrations switch between Pilate and Jesus. Pilate’s conversion certainly fits within the Year of Mercy theme. If Pontius Pilate could receive forgiveness and mercy, we can hope for the same.

Posted in Book Review, Catholic Fiction, Catholic Theme, Easter, Faith, Fiction, fiction, History, Hope, Inspirational, Lent, Lenten Devotion, Mercy, Novel, Resurrection, The Mystery of Suffering, Year of Mercy | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Of Pencils and Love

 

Pencil, Education, Pencil Sharpener, Art

Isn’t is a curiosity that the most astounding contemporary Saint of our time would choose an image that has nothing to do with who she was? Mother Theresa was in all ways a “doer”.  She was the one in the field and getting her hands dirty in places where others would not go.  Yet, she was widely quoted, repeated and written about.  There are scores of her quotes that are on cards, on plaques and in books, yet she was not really a writer herself.  So it is a great curiosity to me that one of her most beloved sayings is about writing.  More than that it’s about God writing:

I am a little pencil in the hand of a writing God who is sending a love letter to the world.” Saint Teresa of Calcutta (9/4/2016)

Because I am a writer this quote causes me a lot of consternation. What is it, I wonder, that I don’t understand about the importance of writing that Mother Teresa did? One of the things that stirs me about this quote is that I am pretty sure that it was not planned.  No persons  of note really ever rehearse what comes out of their mouth.  Sayings and quotes like the one above are straight out of the person’s soul.  So what is it that Mother “knows” from God himself that is reflected in this snippet of wisdom?  No doubt it is a pretty accurate view of the deepest heart of God!  Her trust of him was unfailing.  Trust opens the door to knowledge, especially of “the other”.  In fact, love is not possible without crossing over blindly into trust sooner or later.  I guess that I might even find the above quote a little scary.  Pencil, pencil in someone else’s hand?  That would mean I had completely surrendered any ability and/or influence that I might have to the wielder of the pencil.  Huh, that would mean that I would not be free to express and write down my own thoughts unchallenged!  That would mean I would have to “shut up” and let God completely have his own way with none of my interference and/or advice!  There it is: Father I am nothing in your presence, Jesus I Trust in You, Spirit I know nothing without you.

What a totally unsafe position to be in. That would mean I would have to place myself into the arms of Jesus with ZERO reservations. It seems that St. Teresa of Calcutta did this every minute of every day.  She was able to totally remove all the barriers she had between herself and God.  With a constant listening ear she was able to translate this to the world.  The famous stories about her revolve around her willingness to touch the nastiest and most damaged in the human species.  Without mask, gown, or any kind of barrier she embraced the dying, lepers, people with tuberculosis, those who had wounds filled with maggots, humans covered with waste and those overwhelmed by vermin in their flesh.  Nothing was repugnant to her.  She taught us, of course, that this was the fulfilled and complete definition of love as God himself taught her.

Always loving,  she told us Americans that this kind of ministry is not for everyone.  Here at home we should find “our own Calcutta”.  But then again, there’s that “pencil” thing.  As that quote looks me in the face, I must admit that it is beyond my level of courage.  The quote, however, does not leave my head.  That’s why they call it evangelization.  It has changed me, it will change me.  It will keep changing me along with its challenge.  Just a tiny string of words.  When you speak or write never underestimate the effect for now and for the future!  That’s how God writes!  Thank you Mother.

Copyright© 2016, Kathryn M. Cunningham, All Rights Reserved.

 

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CWG Prayer Chain Post: September 18, 2016

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

First Timothy 2:1-8

I urge then, first of all that petitions, prayers, intercessions and thanksgiving should be offered for everyone, for kings and others in authority, so that we may be able to live peaceful and quiet lives with all devotion and propriety. To do this is right, and acceptable to God our Saviour: he wants everyone to be saved and reach full knowledge of the truth. For there is only one God, and there is only one mediator between God and humanity, himself a human being, Christ Jesus, who offered himself as a ransom for all. This was the witness given at the appointed time, of which I was appointed herald and apostle and — I am telling the truth and no lie — a teacher of the gentiles in faith and truth. In every place, then, I want the men to lift their hands up reverently in prayer, with no anger or argument.

 


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


SEPTEMBER INTENTION PRAYER 

Prayer to St. Michael the Archangel

Saint Michael the Archangel,
defend us in battle.
Be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil.
May God rebuke him, we humbly pray;
and do Thou, O Prince of the Heavenly Host –
by the Divine Power of God –
cast into hell, satan and all the evil spirits,
who roam throughout the world seeking the ruin of souls.

Amen

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | 1 Comment

Bye Bye Sweet Summer

The end of summer is such a unique time, so many things seem possible. It’s like another kind of New Year’s resolution time for many people. School starting again only fuels this sense of ‘back to business’ freshness. These are two pieces that reflect the conflicting seasonal feelings of ‘ending’ and yet beginning anew: 

                                                                                                                Courtesy: Katie O’Neil

Declining Summer by Clinton Scollard 

Reluctantly the summer goes;
The crimson radiance of the rose
Is ashen in the garden-close. 
There is a pleading plaintiveness
In the long hill-wind’s low caress,
Heart-moving and yet passionless. 
The noons are heavy with the heat,
And still, save for the thin-drawn beat
Of the cicada, shrilly-sweet.
 
Faintly the groves begin to grieve,
And grows more mournful eve by eve
The music-web the thrushes weave.
 
And Love, erewhile in vernal guise,
Adown the land, in pensive wise,
Now wanders with averted eyes.
 
 
 

The Last Day of Summer  by William Alexander 

 Hand, Open, Finger, Sand, Rippling Sand
All the sweet summer azure is not fled–
What hath the woodland, then, to do with grief?
The apparition of a yellow leaf,
The half-suspected russet overhead–
Of this it dreams, and is disquieted.
Snowdrops and other dainty things as brief,
Whereof the young anemones were chief,
The tremulous anemones are dead.
Long since the snowdrops have been fain to die;
Long since the anemones have pass’d away:
Some colour’d leaves discolour every morn–
Touch’d by the thought of which cronology
The trees have something that they long to say,
Inaudible, multitudinous, forlorn.
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CWG Book Blast: “Celebrating Advent and Christmas With Children,” by Colleen Rooney

This month, the Catholic Writers’ Guild is touting Guildie Colleen Rooney’s book, Celebrating Advent and Christmas with Children: Food Celebrations with the Saints for Home and School. It is a SOA winner. Are you looking for a warm, inspiring book for Christmas for yourself or as a gift? Look no further!

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Summary: Celebrating Advent and Christmas with Children offers warmth and inspiration and much more. It introduces your children to traditions and customs drawn from many cultures as they prepare to celebrate the birth of Jesus.

Special:  The first person to order the book from my blog will get a second one free and a free eBook!

Web site: https://foodsandfestivitiesofthechristianyear.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html

Excerpt: Are you looking for a warm, inspiring book for Christmas for yourself or as a gift? Look no further! Celebrating Advent and Christmas with Children offers warmth and inspiration and much more. It introduces your children to traditions and customs drawn from many cultures as they prepare to celebrate the birth of Jesus. Learn to make an Advent Bread Dough Wreath or your own edible Advent Calendar. Your children will meet St. Nicholas, while they bake Speculaas cookies and other treats. But don’t stop with St. Nicholas, there is a line-up of saints to keep the children busy with baking as your family or class prepares for the great celebration of the Savior’s birth. When Christmas day is over, do you think the celebrations have finished? Celebrating Advent and Christmas with Children will convince you that Christmas is a season and not just one day! There are special feast days to celebrate throughout the Christmas season and recipes and activities to ensure many happy memories. What can you expect from this book? Parents and teachers will find a new resource to expand their children’s understanding and enjoyment of the Advent and Christmas seasons. It contains background information on the Christian calendar, its seasons and special feast days, along with recipes drawn from Catholic cultural traditions. There are prayers, poems, and illustrations that warm the heart and remind us to take time to prepare, celebrate, and then savor the beauty of Christmas with our children. Planning calendars, Advent and Christmas symbols for the children’s artwork, children’s books and DVDs and much more, make this a book that will outlast Advent and Christmas of 2016.

Bio: Colleen says, “I am a wife, mother of four and grandmother of six with a graduate degree in Catholic Doctrine.  I have spent many holiday seasons preparing for feast day celebrations both in the home and in parishes. My blog is an opportunity for me to share information on the seasons and feasts of the liturgical year plus  some of the delicious recipes that have been associated with these celebrations. I am very interested in incorporating current celebratory foods into our feast day celebrations. I plan to publish this blog once every two weeks. For any inquiries, please contact me at colleen.rooney6@gmail.com”

Buy Link: https://foodsandfestivitiesofthechristianyear.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html

Tweet:  Don’t be caught SHORT! Plan for fun and faith. Buy at author’s low price. “Celebrating Advent & Christmas with Children,” by Colleen Rooney. https://foodsandfestivitiesofthechristianyear.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html

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Learning to Love with the Saints

Learning to Love cover

In the secular world, Jean Heimann could write a book, “The Three Romances of Jean Heimann,” since she tells her story from the perspective of three main romantic interests in her life.

No, Learning to Love with the Saints: a spiritual memoir is far from a romance novel. Jean wrote it as a thoughtful and exciting biography of her faith story and how the saints influenced her. Without these saints in her life, Jean would be one more author reminiscing about the beauty or horror of her love relationships as they unfolded, choice by choice.

With God and the saints in her life, she inspires me to find ways to stay close to our many heavenly friends and live the Theology of the Body. Her main influencers were Mary and Saint John Paul II, in whose words she heard the voice of her earthly father. Jean counts on St. Thérèse of Lisieux, St. Teresa of Avila, Blessed Louis and Zélie Martin, St. John the Evangelist, Blessed John Henry Newman, and St. Sharbel as her intercessors.

Her relationship with saints began with Mary. As Jean grew up, Mary was ever-present in her devout Catholic home where Mass, the sacraments and parochial school were a priority requiring sacrifice. After one engagement had fizzled, Jean married a young man with long hair who reminded her of Jesus but turned out to be an abusive drug addict and an unfaithful spouse who threatened her life when she filed for divorce.

Misguided about the teachings of the Church, she stayed away from Mass, believing that she could not receive the sacraments because she was divorced. She writes,

I was not a wife, a mother, a Catholic, but simply a psychologist and a workaholic. I yearned for intimacy, for true love and commitment, but didn’t trust my judgment. I was terrified of marriage.

Then came the 7-year relationship with romantic, intelligent Erik. He was divorced, the father of two children, anti-Catholic and an agnostic. Troubles came pouring in as a surgeon removed her ovaries and fallopian tubes due to endometriosis. Her sister Mary and then her mother were diagnosed with breast cancer. She described the Good Friday encounter that transformed her life when she went home to visit her parents.

On Good Friday that year, I watched my dad fall to his knees and hug the large cross, tenderly kissing the feet of Jesus. Then, in an instant, my mom was reaching out, bending low, nearly falling off her wheelchair to her knees, to embrace and reverently kiss the feet of the life-sized corpus. It was at that moment that I recognized where the void was in my life. Jesus had been missing! Only His love could fill that hole.

This was the turning point in my life, the decisive moment when I knew I would return to my faith. I realized how much I loved Jesus and how much I missed Him and I yearned to receive Him in the Eucharist. . . .it is only when our hearts are transformed by the love of Christ that we are able to follow after Him. My heart had melted that day, merging with His.

When she ended her engagement to Erik, he immediately suffered heart failure. She ended up caring for him as his only friend for a year during his hospitalization and recuperation. But now she had her faith, and her friends in Cursillo, a charismatic prayer group as well as the saints supporting her in prayer. She was back home in the Church, with the Holy Spirit burning within her.

Jean met Bill, her third romance, at a charismatic conference. He was undeniably the answer to her prayers for a godly man. Their friendship led to a lifetime commitment to putting God first in their lives. She writes,

I really sensed that we were on a par spiritually and fell in love with the beauty of God that emanated from his soul. I felt as if I had so much love inside of me and that it was meant to be shared with him for the rest of our lives.

Jean credits the influence of John Paul II’s Theology of the Body in understanding and embracing the marriage relationship that is more beautiful than she ever dreamed was possible.

Jean Heimann 2

Jean M. Heimann is a Catholic author and freelance writer with an M.A. in Theology, a parish minister and diocesan speaker, a retired psychologist and educator, and an Oblate with the Community of St. John.  In addition to her highly acclaimed first book, Seven Saints for Seven Virtues, Jean has had her work published in a variety of Catholic periodicals, some of which include: National Catholic Register, Catholic Exchange, Canticle Magazine, and St. Anthony Messenger/America. She blogs at her award-winning blog, Catholic Fire http://catholicfire.blogspot.com/

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CWG Prayer Chain Post: September 11, 2016

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

First Timothy 1:12-17

I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who has given me strength. By calling me into his service he has judged me trustworthy, even though I used to be a blasphemer and a persecutor and contemptuous. Mercy, however, was shown me, because while I lacked faith I acted in ignorance; but the grace of our Lord filled me with faith and with the love that is in Christ Jesus. Here is a saying that you can rely on and nobody should doubt: that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. I myself am the greatest of them; and if mercy has been shown to me, it is because Jesus Christ meant to make me the leading example of his inexhaustible patience for all the other people who were later to trust in him for eternal life. To the eternal King, the undying, invisible and only God, be honour and glory for ever and ever. Amen.

 


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


SEPTEMBER INTENTION PRAYER 

Prayer to St. Michael the Archangel

Saint Michael the Archangel,
defend us in battle.
Be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil.
May God rebuke him, we humbly pray;
and do Thou, O Prince of the Heavenly Host –
by the Divine Power of God –
cast into hell, satan and all the evil spirits,
who roam throughout the world seeking the ruin of souls.

Amen

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

Posted in Catholic Writing and Publishing | Leave a comment

Into the Way of Peace, by Karen Kelly Boyce

Into the Way of Peace blends the mystical with the mysterious.

While a blizzard swirls around an inner city church, a desperate few pass within. Some seek shelter from the storm. Others desire consolation because of life’s overwhelming burdens. One young man hopes to escape a police manhunt.

Fr. D’Angelico welcomes each guest to worship before the Blessed Sacrament. He has served at Holy Rosary Church for fifty years, as curate, pastor and now a retired resident. In his younger days, he had fallen victim to the “heresy of good works.” At that time, he had believed that the success of his ministry depended solely on him. Now, aged, arthritic and terminally ill, he has learned through prayer that Jesus alone brings in the harvest.

The Lord has given this faithful servant the gift of reading souls. This night, Fr. D’Angelico’s special charism tells him that seven souls will kneel before the Blessed Sacrament and receive a life-altering visit from Jesus, himself.

Frankie the Bottle, an alcoholic, seeks a warm place to crash. He drinks to forget that his carelessness killed his wife and daughter. Two professional men enter, full of emotion and conflict—their wealth and position are the consequence of choosing the expedient rather than what they know to be right. Two women mourn for estranged children who will never speak to them again. A Polish Catholic survivor of Auschwitz, who has lived for others without appreciation, could do much more in life if she only recognized her unique but underutilized charism. Bobby, rich and spoiled—a prodigal son—desperately needs to accept God’s love.

Fr. D’Angelico and the seven souls interact throughout this interlocking collection of short stories. Some souls consider the monstrance and the host an idolatrous perversion of Christianity. Nevertheless, both the Eucharist and the Scriptures make a powerful impression on each as they deal with the hopelessness of their situations.

Karen Kelly Boyce has the knack of stitching together the earthy and the heavenly so that her gripping stories both startle and edify the reader. Many know her for her delightful Sisters of the Last Straw series, her darker novels like In the Midst of Wolves, or her inspirational Down Right Good and A Bend in the Road. Into the Way of Peace finds itself in good company.

Posted in Book Review, Catholic Fiction, Catholic Theme, Faith, Family Life, Fiction, fiction, Hope, Inspirational, Mercy, mystery, Novel, Prayer, suspense, The Mystery of Suffering | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments