Writers as Tour Guides

I’m involved in a project to organize a reading plan for students. It has made me aware, in a new way, of the value of the riches stored in my head from past reading. No machine could correlate a lifetime of reading, experience, attendance at conference talks, and digging for citations through a huge collection of quotations and book notes. It actually takes a person who has ‘been there’ to lead another through the huge territory of even one ‘subject’ to all the best ‘destinations’.

The first requirement for such leadership may be the reading, but the next is surely the humility to realize there is no way to make this itinerary and do justice to that territory. Actually, the humility did come first, in the form of willingness to read, to be influenced, to enter conversation with authors living and dead with a teachable spirit. Let us hope the students have that spirit, as a guided tour is a whirlwind experience. When you wander a new country alone, you miss much that is great, but you do retain the freedom to go at your own speed. A student relinquishes this freedom to her teacher, so I need to be careful not to overwhelm her in my zeal.

But zeal it is! I want to give everything, point out each stop along the way and each signpost that showed me the next direction to take. Alas, I can’t lead by the same route I took, or we’ll be here for thirty years. I must make a reasonable stab at giving students an overview, sharing my reasons for picking and choosing, and then eliminating almost everything I wish I could share with them. It’s an awful dilemma. Without guidance, they will wander (and yes, I do recall Tolkein’s wisdom, that “all who wander are not lost.”) and may be led astray, or into dead ends, wasting their limited time here, or worse. I must accept the mantle of authority and, like the artist making the first stroke on a canvas and thereby excluding many visions for the possible painting, make some difficult decisions.

G.K. Chesterton said, “The essence of all art is the frame.” I know he would understand why I take a deep breath and, hyper-conscious of my inadequacy, begin to frame my students’ journey. Time is a limiting factor, so I begin with the simple reality of the number of ‘pieces’ into which the class must be broken. Intro, concluding wrap-up – that’s two pieces gone. Now for the sectioning…what will be my organizing principle…east-to-west is easy by comparison with this. Chronology is handy for a history course, but this one involves history within other topics, so that cannot be the overarching principle. Finally, I settle on the main section divisions and get to work on the piles of topical material that clearly will not fit the resulting time-per-topic.

I won’t bore you with all the rest. It’s much like writing a book, and you’ve been there, done that. I want to leave you with the thought that artists and teachers, writers and tour guides have much in common. It’s lonely work to prepare a form that others will enter almost effortlessly by comparison. Because teaching is a work of mercy, I think this is work worth doing. Blessings to you tour guides out there who would rather be writing fiction!

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Evangelizing: Since I Have No Pulpit I Use the Written Word and Social Media

Monday, April 25th, we celebrated the feast of the St. Mark the Evangelist. Mark (sometimes referred to as John Mark) wrote the first and the shortest gospel. The Entrance Antiphon for the Mass that day was as follows: “Go into the world and proclaim the Gospel to every creature, alleluia.” (Mark 16:15)

Pope Francis, in Evangelli Gaudium, encourages all of us to NOT keep the faith to ourselves but to go forth and  transform the world to Christ. The Holy Father wants a church of missionary disciples. Following the Pope’s lead, the young priest in our parish, Father Dan, gave a homily on St. Mark’s feast day, exhorting us all to go forth and proclaim the Good News—to everyone.

Pope Francis has a “bully pulpit.” So does Father Dan. They are expected to preach these things to us. I can only speak for myself but I do NOT have a “bully pulpit.” I do have a few plastic milk crates in the garage but I do not have the courage to set them down on a busy street corner or at a mall and start preaching to passers-by. (In today’s day and age I would probably get locked up as an intolerant loon, although that would not bother me.) The point is, it is not easy for us lay people to proselytize and/or preach the Good News unless we have a somewhat captive audience.

Those of us here at the CWG can interact with each other (whether it be one on one or in a group) about Catholic stuff. We can rail on about the secular attacks on our faith, have differences of opinion and post our deepest feelings that oftentimes come out in our written words. CWG can be our “bully pulpit.” So can a CCD class, or a Legion of Mary meeting, a Knights of Columbus meeting or even a simple bible study in the parish hall or someone’s home. But in all of those examples we are, as the cliche goes, “preaching to the choir.” How do we proselytize and spread the  Good news? I have my own method I will share and it is very simple. (It has definitely cost me friends, but so be it.)

I assume that most of us being writers, besides using the written word, also use some social media (which may include Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, or others.) I have accounts on all of them but I do not understand Pinterest yet and rarely go to LinkedIn. I do use Facebook and Twitter. And I use them to perform my own feeble efforts to evangelize.

Every day (well, almost every day) I post something Catholic/Christian on Facebook and Twitter. I will place quotes from saints with their pictures, or links to Catholic/Christian stories and so forth. Today I posted a picture of a two year old girl named Ida, who was killed in the Holocaust. I posted little Ida’s photo because this is Passover week and all our Catholic beginnings come from Judaism (people and customs). We are joined at the hip with Judaism. Plus, I am writing Catholic/Christian fiction and I am blogging Catholic/Christian themes which I post on social media.

Anyway, that is how I try to evangelize. I know no other way. And yes, my list of “friends” include many Catholic/Christians,  many non-Christians, some agnostics and  two known atheists. My “friends” list has dwindled for sure (some folks whom I have known for decades no longer interact) but it has also expanded. It is in constant flux. No matter–I am evangelizing the only way I know how.

In conclusion, if you do Facebook or Twitter or any of the other social media you can get a bit creative and spread the Good News right there. If you have any ideas on ways to evangelize to those we do not know, I would love to hear some.

Copyright 2016 Larry Peterson

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CWG Prayer Chain Post: May 1, 2016

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

John 14:23-29

Jesus replied: Anyone who loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we shall come to him and make a home in him. Anyone who does not love me does not keep my words. And the word that you hear is not my own: it is the word of the Father who sent me. I have said these things to you while still with you; but the Paraclete, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything and remind you of all I have said to you. Peace I bequeath to you, my own peace I give you, a peace which the world cannot give, this is my gift to you. Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid. You heard me say: I am going away and shall return. If you loved me you would be glad that I am going to the Father, for the Father is greater than I. I have told you this now, before it happens, so that when it does happen you may believe.

 


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


MAY INTENTION PRAYER 

Mary, Mother of God

O Mary, Mother of God, as You are above all creatures in Heaven and Earth, more glorious than the Cherubim, more noble than any here below, Christ has given You to His people, firm bulwark and Protectress, to shield and save sinners who fly unto You. Therefore O Lady, all-embracing refuge, we solemnly recall Your sweet protection and beg Christ forever for His mercy. Amen

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

 

 

 

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Giving What Is Holy To Dogs

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The Spouse of Christ must pattern her behaviour after the Son of God who went out to everyone without exception.             Pope Francis, Misericordiae Vultus, par. 12

Sitting in our gloriously sunny, tranquil parish adoration chapel, I had just finished underlining a very beautiful section of Deus Caritas Est (God Is Love) by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI:

Seeing with the eyes of Christ, I can give to others much more than their own outward necessities; I can give them the look of love which they crave. Here we see the necessary interplay between love of God and love of neighbor which the First Letter of John speaks of with such insistence. If I have no contact whatsoever with God in my life, then I cannot see in the other anything more than the other, and I am incapable of seeing in him the image of God…Only my readiness to encounter my neighbor and to show him love makes me sensitive to God as well.

I was reading the Encyclical as a personal penance for my habitual sin of judging others, which I had confessed to a priest only four days earlier. Before I knew it, my pernicious habit took over and I began thinking about a particular political candidate whom I consider to be perfectly godless. “He clearly has no contact with God,” I thought, reflecting on the words of the Encyclical. “That’s pretty obvious by the way he assumes that all immigrants are enemies with malicious intentions, instead of seeing them as God’s children who are genuinely in need of mercy. Jesus, teach me to love my neighbor,” I prayed, “and to see you in those in need.”

While I pondered these thoughts a man knocked on the chapel door, indicating that he was not a regular since he didn’t know the code to let himself in. Leaning over in my chair to open the glass door, my eyes met those of a disheveled, tattooed twenty-something looking person with long, dirty hair. He came in and took a seat in the leather chair across the aisle from mine, then began to stare into space looking quite disturbed. My first instinct was to thank God that there was another woman in the chapel with me, because the man was suspicious looking, at best. I then began to wonder if he was a drug addict in need of money, and thanked God that my purse was locked in my car. After about ten minutes of his aimless staring, I started to feel frightened, as I sensed he was up to something sinister. Just then, he stood up to leave.

“Can you open the door for me again when I come back?” the stranger asked. “I forgot something in my car.”

“Sure,” I smiled stiffly, thinking: “Oh, dear God, what could he be going to get from his car?” My heart began to race as my mind ran off on a tangent, and within sixty seconds of the stranger’s departure I had concluded that he was going to get a gun from his vehicle, and that I was facing imminent death as a martyr right in front of the Blessed Sacrament.

“Excuse me,” I impulsively whispered to the woman seated in front of the chapel, who was completely oblivious to the stranger until now. “I think the man who just came in is unstable, and he went to get something from his car. I’m scared of what he’s going to do. Do you think we should call for help?” I asked, motioning to the phone on the wall.

Before she had a chance to answer, the stranger knocked on the door again, and I squinted through the glass to see if he was carrying a weapon. Seeing nothing, I bent over again to let him in, this time quite haltingly.

“I forgot this in my car,” he said as he reached into his pocket. I held my breath. Out came an empty holy water bottle, which he simply wanted to fill. “My dog is dying, and I figured I’d try blessing him as a last resort,” he smiled, suddenly looking innocent as a lamb.

I reached into the drawer next to me to retrieve the holy water bottle, and watched shame-faced as he filled his little container with the blessed sacramental.

“Take the wooden beam out of my eye, Lord,” I prayed after the poor man left, embarrassed over my judgment of both him and the political candidate.

I had definitely gotten the point. And I could almost hear God giggling in the silence.

Note: This article was previously published at Aleteia and appears here with their kind permission.

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Freelance Writing – How to Charge for Your Services

When a freelance writer answers a call for submission, frequently the level of payment is indicated in the posting. It may be a fixed rate per article or a fixed amount per word. In applying for these types of jobs, the freelancer’s main job is to get hired.

But at times the freelancer will be contacted by a publisher asking them to quote a fee for a proposed job. Having work sent to you is great, but now you have another problem: What should you charge? Not so obvious to the new freelancer is an associated question: How should you charge? The nature of the proposed work will determine the best method for you.

Most people work at jobs that pay them a set rate per hour. This method of charging is open to the freelancer. If the freelancer chooses this option, their goal then is to set an appropriate market rate for their work. Technical writing that requires significant specialized knowledge can command $150 per hour. More generic writing may pay $15 per hour.

Freelancers also commonly charge a per-word rate for their work. Again, the challenge is to choose a market rate that is specific to the type of writing they are doing. Per-word rates can range from pennies per word to $10 per word.

A third option is to quote a set amount for the finished article, independent of word count or hours spent writing.

But there are other options besides these. If a project consists of dozens or even hundreds of separate smaller parts, then a fee for each item can be quoted. Some of the separate items may be short and easily finished in a brief time. Others may be longer and require extensive research. The freelancer should bill for each item accordingly.

If the freelancer’s work is a narrative that will be read as a commercial script or recited as a speech, then charging for the run time of the commercial or speech is an option. The range depends on the specific setting (national to local) and context (news vs. entertainment vs. educational vs. advertising). An example of this type of billing is $100 per 30 seconds of run time. The rates can go higher.

If the freelancer’s work is for a play or movie, they also may receive a percentage of the gross ticket sales in addition to a fixed fee.

Along with how much and how to charge is the question of when payment will be received. With long projects that may require the freelancer to block off weeks or even months of writing time, an advance is reasonable, along with periodic payments as parts of the project are completed.

Freelance writing provides a variety of opportunities. For the freelancer, one method of payment may not fit all the options available.

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The Twelve Steps of being a Spiritual Writer

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Step Three – Made a decision to turn our writing and our writing career over to the care of God

 

So we’ve prayed and turned our writing over. Suddenly, we feel a peace that surpasses all understanding. Our work is flowing. We are sure and proud of what we have written. All the people in our writing group loved it! Our best friends want to read it. We have a true sense that we have written what God has wanted us to write and that we have given it our best time and talent. We have edited it dozens of time. We have had beta readers review it. Our local priest thinks it is wonderful. We have had it professionally edited.

We research the best potential publishers and follow their submission guidelines to the letter. We post our work and, returning home from the post office, find ourselves feeling as if we just left our child at his first day of kindergarten or packed our teenager off to college. Suddenly, everything is out of our control. We don’t know who will have our package land on their desk. Will they be in a good or sour mood? Have they just read a dozen similar stories or are they sick of characters similar to ours? Heck, did they just have a fight with their husband who acts a lot like our protagonist?  Our baby, the one we protected and coddled, is out in the cruel world and we have no idea how they are being treated.

Is my baby lying beneath other babies in a large heap called a slush pile? Is some editor in her bed and drinking wine as she laughs derisively at my prose? Is she allowing my baby to come apart and disheveled as she lets the pages fall aimlessly to the floor? The thought of what is happening to your baby book, article or novel after it leaves your care is not bound by any truth. We are writers and our imagination is wild with possibilities. Those possibilities can be mythically great. I can imagine an editor disrupting a board meeting to announce that she has found the great American novel. She announces that everyone is to drop their current project to get this masterpiece out in the next week. Or I can imagine an editor with piles of manuscripts spilling their diet coke on my manuscript (which they used to protect their desk) and tossing it unread into the waste can as they lick the seam on a form rejection letter addressed to me.

The possibilities are endless, and so is my imagination. How do I let go? How do I give my writing and its care over to God? I have to or else I can let my faith in myself and my works weaken with every rejection. If I trust that I have done my best and faithfully followed the Divine lead, I have to let it go.

I find the best way is to do just that. Say a prayer and start another work. Get myself caught up in the new work and forget about the finished work that is floating around there in the publishing cloud. When I try to find a publisher, I make a list of possibilities. If my work is returned with a form rejection letter, I immediately repackage it to the next publisher on my list and mail it or email it to the next publisher the very day I receive it back. If an editor takes the time to critique the work, I carefully go over the suggestions, and make the changes that they propose. That is, if I find merit in their work. If it doesn’t compromise the story or change the intent of the piece, I humbly make the changes and send it back to the same editor.

I don’t hold on to it. I have already sent it out to the world and I don’t take it back. I have to trust that God will find just the right person to publish it. Sometimes it just takes a few mailings. Sometimes it takes numerous mailings. If I reach the end of my list, I trust that God still wants the work published. I don’t doubt my gift or my calling. I, after exhausting my list, self-publish my work. I believe in God. I believe in myself, and I believe in my work. Next post, let’s talk about handing our writing career over to God.

Karen Kelly Boyce is a mother of two and grandmother of two who lives on a farm in N.J. with her retired husband. She and her husband love to camp and take ‘road trips’ around the country. She has published four novels and three children’s books. Her website is www.karenkellyboyce.com

 

 

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CWG Prayer Chain Post: April 24, 2016

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

John 13:31-33, 34-35

When he had gone, Jesus said: Now has the Son of man been glorified, and in him God has been glorified. If God has been glorified in him, God will, in turn, glorify him in himself, and will glorify him very soon. Little children, I shall be with you only a little longer. You will look for me, and, as I told the Jews, where I am going, you cannot come. I give you a new commandment: love one another; you must love one another just as I have loved you. It is by your love for one another, that everyone will recognize you as my disciples.


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


APRIL INTENTION PRAYER

The Gloria
Glory to God in the highest. And on earth peace to men of good will. We praise You. We bless You. We adore you. We glorify You. We give You thanks for Your great glory. O Lord God, heavenly King, God the Father almighty. O Lord Jesus Christ, the Only-begotten Son. O Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father: you Who take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us. You Who take away the sins of the world, receive our prayer. You Who sit at the right hand of the Father, have mercy on us. For you alone are holy. You alone are the Lord. You alone, O Jesus Christ, are most high. Together with the Holy Spirit in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

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Senior Moments

Family, Mother, Daughter, Women, Female

The following is a not an uncommon claim for people who spend time with the elderly or those who have symptoms of afflictions like Alzheimer’s or dementia:  “I’ve heard that one million times before!”   We often witness that comment couched in sarcasm or disdain because somehow that experience that has caused us an inconvenience!  Hmmmmmm………… a great suffering, right? Isn’t it interesting that in this society of techno toys and electronic communication we can actually be annoyed by another human talking to us?  I guess we’d rather have a conversation with Siri?

Despite the fact that we are totally electronics saturated it is no surprise that the Bible still has a pertinent comment to make on the topic of: I heard this before from a senior.  If you have any perseverance at all you will find that scripture has a pertinent comment on just about any life situation that you could come upon. It seems that humans are indeed humans and always have been. I marvel at the number of self-help books that have literally exploded in the last few years.  People want answers, experts, surety. All of that, even in written form, is pretty much an illusion and fluid depending on circumstances.  As believers, though, we have the master manual written by the original manufacturer himself.  Check that book first!

But, back to the idea of the senior moment.  Sometimes when we get caught up in the idea of our own world and how things revolve around our own lives we lose perspective.  As we come in contact with others we forget to give respect.  With a senior, toddler or anyone who has something to say to us we forget that we’re all in this together.  Every piece of information that someone has is a tiny bit of school for the rest of us. It might be a lesson, an experience, information or just shared presence.  This can be especially true when someone gives us their memories.  This is more of a privilege than you might recognize. The prophet himself defined the value of memory.

  “Take care and be earnestly the things which your own eyes have seen, nor let them slip from your memory as long as you live, but teach them to your children and your children’s children.” (Deut 4:9-10)

You see, in any culture the memories are the glue that keep it all together.  Memories inform, teach, correct, caution, and train.  They also multiply joy and divide sorrow.  So when a senior shares a memory even for the umpteenth time it has unspeakable value even if the value is simply the exercise of patience or the practice of respect for the listener.  No memory shared is a waste or should be thought of as in inconvenience.

If you think of it in a broad sense, the memories of our seniors and emotionally disabled are like customized scripture for our household, our family, our community, our culture.  After all what is the Bible, we profess, but a larger collection of the memories of our faith.  Paul teaches:

All scripture is inspired by God and is useful for teaching, for refutation, for correction, and for training in righteousness.”  (2Tim 3:16)  

 So treat those senior moments and seniors with a different perspective and the value they deserve.  Senior “stories” may not be the actual word of the Lord, but they hold great value for the listener as well as the teller!  What skills have you failed to learn because you have passed up the opportunity that was handed to you by a story telling senior?

©2016, Kathryn M. Cunningham

 

 

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CWG Prayer Chain Post: April 17, 2016

The CWG Prayer Chain Post is a weekly post for members to include their special intentions by adding a comment.

John 10:27-30

The sheep that belong to me listen to my voice; I know them and they follow me. I give them eternal life; they will never be lost and no one will ever steal them from my hand. The Father, for what he has given me, is greater than anyone, and no one can steal anything from the Father’s hand. The Father and I are one.

 


The power of prayer and the power of people praying.


APRIL INTENTION PRAYER

The Gloria
Glory to God in the highest. And on earth peace to men of good will. We praise You. We bless You. We adore you. We glorify You. We give You thanks for Your great glory. O Lord God, heavenly King, God the Father almighty. O Lord Jesus Christ, the Only-begotten Son. O Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father: you Who take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us. You Who take away the sins of the world, receive our prayer. You Who sit at the right hand of the Father, have mercy on us. For you alone are holy. You alone are the Lord. You alone, O Jesus Christ, are most high. Together with the Holy Spirit in the glory of God the Father. Amen.

Please leave a comment with your intention. If you have problems adding an intention, email it to Mike Hays at coachhays(at)gmail(dot)com and I will add it.  God bless.

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CWG Book Blast: “Stay With Me,” by Carolyn Astfalk

This month, the Catholic Writers’ Guild is touring Guildie Carolyn Astfalk’s book, STAY WITH ME. It is a CWG Seal of approval winner.

Teaser:

With the counsel of their friend Father John, can Rebecca and Chris overcome every obstacle and bridge the deepening gulf between them and her dad? Or will a crucial lapse in judgment and its repercussion end their relationship? 

Stay with Me front cover

Summary:

With her sister Abby’s encouragement, Rebecca has moved out of their overbearing father’s home. When a chance encounter with Chris ends with an invitation, Rebecca says yes. The authentic way Chris lives his life attracts Rebecca and garners her affection. 


Chris loves Rebecca and her innocence, but he’s confounded by the emotional scars she bears from her parents and an attempted assault. Her father’s disdain for Chris’s faith and career only make matters worse. 

With the counsel of their friend Father John, can Rebecca and Chris overcome every obstacle and bridge the deepening gulf between them and her dad? Or will a crucial lapse in judgment and its repercussion end their relationship? 

Special Considerations:

Stay With Me is always free with Kindle Unlimited or Amazon Prime.

Web site:

http://www.carolynastfalk.com/carolyn-astfalk-author/books/stay-with-me/

Excerpt:

Chris drove them to the battlefield. His knowledge of its topography and history impressed Rebecca. No matter how many times she’d been there, she’d get all balled up not knowing which way to the Peach Orchard, Devil’s Den, or anything else. The narrow, one-way lanes always made her feel like a rat in a maze. Chris knew every entrance and exit, where the major monuments were located, which roads went

which directions, and where you could find a quiet spot away from all the tourists. That’s where he took her. They sat in the high grass beneath a smallish monument topped by an eagle, frozen in its majesty, and spent the next two hours mending their hearts.

The late summer moon loomed large and orange over the horizon. Wisps of smoky clouds floated above and beneath the giant, luminous orb. Crickets and katydids hummed and

chirped from the thickets and trees, their chorus lending a soothing undercurrent to the heartfelt whispers and professions that passed between them like a zephyr snaking a path through the wild grasses and sedges.

Rebecca plucked a long blade of grass from the hard earth and slid her fingers up its length. The sharp edge caught the tender skin of her fingertip, and it bled. She pressed her finger to her lips, and the pain subsided. She didn’t think she’d ever forget the aching, bone-deep hurt she’d felt since she’d walked out on Chris. In some ways, she didn’t want to. He was a precious gift to her, and she never wanted to take him for granted.

She had feared that even if they reconciled, that hurt would never fully heal; it would fester beneath the surface. But when they climbed back onto his bike and she wrapped her arms around his waist, she realized the fissure was already being soothed and filled, that love was spilling into all the brittle cracks and crevices that the pain had etched. Love really did cover all offenses. It was okay. They would be okay.

Bio:

Carolyn Astfalk lives in Hershey, Pennsylvania where the scent on the morning breeze carries either chocolate or manure depending on wind direction and atmospheric conditions.

A Pittsburgh native, Carolyn carries her Yinzer card with pride, having interned at Pittsburgh’s iconic TV and radio stations KDKA and WDVE. She is a graduate of Duquesne University, where she majored in Latin and Broadcast Journalism.

A cradle Catholic, Carolyn was raised mainly at church basement rummage sales and other parish-sponsored events. She worked her way up to “pup girl” at weekly Bingo and even served as a parish organist for several years. Having reached the apex of parish ministry, she moved to the state capital to advance her churchy career.

Carolyn served as communications director and registered lobbyist for the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference for a decade, advocating for religious liberty; prolife, pro-family issues, Catholic education, and healthcare, among others.

Since then, she has been a stay-at-home mom to her four children. Most days she can be found changing diapers, wiping up spills, folding laundry, and tapping furiously on her laptop.

Carolyn is a member of the Catholic Writers Guild, Pennwriters, the Pennsylvania Public Relations Society, and 10 Minute Novelists. She blogs at My Scribbler’s Heart.

Buy Link:

http://www.amazon.com/Stay-Me-Carolyn-Astfalk-ebook/dp/B015GAH77M/

Tweet:

Can love set you free? 5-star Theology of the Body romance Stay With Me @CMAstfalk bit.ly/staywithmenovel #inspyromance #Catholicfiction

Posted in Catholic book blast, Catholic Fiction, Catholic Writing and Publishing, Fiction, fiction, Novel, romance | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment